gun rust-free

Keeping Your New Gun Rust-Free

The upward trend of gun purchases is greater than ever this holiday season (which coincides with hunting season). Although lacking in any official national sales tally, we do know background checks by the FBI’s NICS reached 21 million nationally last year. The National Shooting Sports Foundation reports 2021 is shaping up to be the second-highest gun sales year in history, just behind 2020. If you receive a new gun as a gift, it’s important to take care of it properly to ensure it lasts for years to come – and functions correctly each time. Keeping your gun rust-free is an essential part of firearm care – and safety.

“A rusted gun is a dangerous gun,” explained Zerust Consumer Products CEO Budd Dworkin. “Unfortunately, people too often underestimate how quickly rust can creep into the crevices and cause major problems, ones that may not even be blatantly visible. As rust prevention experts, we take this very seriously, which is why we offer numerous solutions that will work for just about every type of firearm – and firearm owner.”

Rust is the union of oxygen + moisture + metal (specifically, iron and its alloys). Other types of metal can be similarly corroded, but it’s only iron metals, which include steel, stainless steel, cast iron, wrought iron, ferrochrome, elinvar, and kovar, that are technically considered “rust.”  With firearms, it can eat away at the metal components, resulting in a range of problems going beyond mere discoloration.

The moving parts of a gun can be adversely impacted, particularly at the points of contact, where you may see more wear and reduced slide. If a magazine spring rusts, it could result in failure to feed. If the slide of a gun is rusted, there could be issues with failure to cycle, extract, or eject. In the barrel, rust can even cause potential explosion due to pressure.