prevent boat tool rust

3 Ways To Prevent Tool Rust on a Boat

With no hardware stores on the open sea, smart boaters keep certain tools onboard to ensure they’re prepared to tackle on-the-spot repairs while on the water. But it’s imperative to have a plan to prevent tool rust on your boat, otherwise your tool kit won’t be much good to you.

Must-haves typically include an emergency kit with with a waterproof flashlight/headlamp, jumper cables, tow line, flare gun, and fire extinguisher, but also handy extras like Phillips and Flathead screwdrivers, long needle nose pliers, locking pliers, ratchet and sockets with spark plug match, a rigging knife, hose clamps, multi-meter, wire stripper, prop wrench, and a moisture meter.

Many of these boat tools are made with rubber or plastic handles for easy gripping, but the metal elements are still at risk for rust and corrosion.boat tool rust prevention

Scientifically speaking, rust is referred to as iron oxide. It’s a chemical reaction that occurs when ferrous metals (those made of or deriving in part from iron) meet water and oxygen. Similar types of corrosion can happen with different kinds of metals. Certain elements can accelerate the rust and corrosion processes, namely salt and grit/grime.

Even if you keep your tools in a dry spot, there’s more moisture in the air in a marine environment. That can be enough to cause your tools to rust in a short window of time – particularly if your boat is on saltwater.

Fortunately, there are ways you can protect your boat tools from rust and corrosion, without much great effort or cost.

1. Wipe Tools After Use and Coat With Oil.

Anytime your tools have been in use, it’s important to ensure they’re free of dirt and grime, and there is no water left on or near metal parts. Once clean and dry, consider coating them with a thin layer of oil. Zerust Axxanol Spray-G is a spray-on light lubricant oil that offers advanced corrosion protection to prevent tool rust for up to 1 year outdoors.

2. Use a Toolbox Drawer Liner to Prevent Tool Rust.

Zerust toolbox drawer liners are made with heavy-duty, non-slip rubber, and our patented VCI formula to protect against rust and corrosion for up to 5 years. VCI stands for vapor corrosion inhibitor. The material releases a colorless, odorless vapor that settles in a molecule-thin layer that shields metal components from corrosive elements like moisture and salt. Liners can be cut to size, and they also prevent slipping, denting, and mold/mildew formation. They’re easy to wipe down with a damp cloth, and are fire retardant as well.

3. Use a Rust Prevention Vapor Capsule.

Rust prevention vapor capsules are an easy, inexpensive way to keep protect your boat tools from rusting. These capsules also use the VCI formula, and can simply be placed inside any stowage bench or locker. These come in different sizes, and are easily placed on the interior of your storage container with an adhesive backing.

Using these strategies, you can buy a relatively cheap storage system (plastic, etc.) – as long as it’s solid and sealable. Combine that with cleaning, drying, and oiling your tools after use, and incorporating at least one other VCI tool rust solution.

Contact Zerust for information on boat rust prevention by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Unprecedented detail on how rust happens, Feb. 4, 2019, DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Science Daily

More Blog Entries:

Battling Aluminum Boat Corrosion Off Saltwater Shores, April 14, 2022, Zerust Boat Tool Rust Prevention Blog

classic car rust

Classic Car Rust: What to Look For Before You Buy

When it comes to older vehicles, classic car rust is a top concern. Knowing what to look for before you buy – as well as how to protect your car from rust once it’s in your care – are imperatives. You want to know exactly what sort of challenges you may be dealing with, and you also want to protect your investment.

By 2024, the global classic car market is expected to grow significantly, to a total value of around $43.5 billion, with vintage cars being especially popular in North America and Europe. A survey by IHS Automotive revealed the typical car on U.S. roads is 11.5-years-old – a record in a country that historically values getting a new ride every few years. The number of vehicles on the road that are at least 25-years-old is somewhere around 14 million, up from 8 million 20 years ago.

To be considered “classic,” a car must be at least 20-years-old. An “antique” car is one that is at least 45-years-old. And a vintage car is one that is manufactured sometime between 1919 and 1930, and is either a “survivor” or has been restored to conform to the original manufacturer specifications.

According to Hagerty, the largest insurer specializing exclusively in older vehicles, more than 90 percent of class car purchases occur on the private market. That creates a “buyer beware” situation when it comes to classic car rust.

What to Look for When Examining a Vehicle for Classic Car Rust

Of course, no vehicle buyer wants to spot even a speck of rust, though it’s rare to find a decades-old vehicle without any signs of rust. The problem is that once rust takes hold, it can end up being a recurring problem.

For those purchasing older cars, identifying where the rust is, how prevalent it is, and how extensive the damage will be important.

Some rust red flags include:

motorcycle covers

The Best Motorcycle Covers Keep Your Bike Safe From Rust and Corrosion

May is motorcycle safety awareness month, and spring marks the start of prime riding season in many areas of the U.S. It’s a good time to note that keeping your bike road-worthy is key to ensuring safety on the streets. Beyond routine mechanical maintenance and cleaning, that means proper motorcycle storage – with a decent cover. The best motorcycle covers on the market are those that not only deter theft and prevent damage caused by direct exposure to the elements, but also safeguard against rust and corrosion. Make sure when you buy that it offers VCI – vapor corrosion inhibitor.

Why Motorcycles are at Risk of Rust

Many types of corrosion – rust included – are chemical reactions triggered by the trifecta of metal + oxygen + moisture. Other elements, like salt and mud, can act as accelerants.

Rust is like a cancer for motor vehicles. Motorcycle rust can creep up quickly, be tough to spot, and do notable damage before you realize what’s wrong.motorcycle covers

As mentioned in a previous blog on our motorcycle covers, bikes are often made with numerous components that contain ferrous metals (those containing iron, and thus susceptible to the specific form of corrosion we all know as rust.) This includes the cast iron brake shoe liners and the steel camshafts, gears, sprockets, oil tanks, headlamp housing, exhaust valves, and mudguards.

While many of the visible metal parts on a motorcycle are likely lined with ceramic coating or other protective compounds, that’s not always true with interior workings. Beyond that, all it takes is a few stray pebbles to scratch and pock a metal surface, making that area especially vulnerable to corrosive damage.

prevent corroded tools

Rust-Busting Plastabs Prevent Corroded Tools

Hammer or hand saw, screwdriver or square – the tools in your toolbox have a broad range of uses, but all share a single foe: Rust. Prevention of corroded tools can be as simple as tossing in a tiny, thin rectangle of polyethylene in your toolbox.

Large companies have long trusted Zerust Plastabs to protect the metal contents of their shipments from corrosion and rust while packed away for long journeys across air, land, and sea. Individuals can now do the same for the the tools in which they’ve invested – whether you store them in a toolbox, closet, cabinet, or drawer.Tool box rust

Corroded Tools are Compromised Tools

As you may know, rust is a chemical reaction compound that results when oxygen reacts with iron (or its alloys) in the presence of water or moisture. Not all metals are iron or iron alloys, but they may still be susceptible to similar types of corrosion when exposed to water, moisture, and oxygen – as well as proximity to other types of metal.

As noted by the Electrochemical Society, corrosion is the same force that costs billions of dollars in damages every year – from building collapses to oil pipeline breaks, chemical plant leaks to ships sinking, floods to fires. The fact that these occurrences continue even when we clearly know the cause is a testament to how quickly the damage can be done if preventative measures are undertaken.

With tools, rust and other forms of corrosion can decimate effectiveness, causing them to dull, weaken, malfunction, or even break entirely. That can be incredibly dangerous when you’re working on a job that requires great caution and precision.

Beyond that, there’s the risk of tetanus. Metal tools like nails, knives, and gardening sheers that are left to rust in their natural environments are going to be prone to attracting the bacteria that causes tetanus. (Note: Rust itself doesn’t cause tetanus, but it’s a good indicator that the environment is ripe for Clostridia bacteria growth.)

While there are ways to rescue some rust-bitten devices, there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to stop the spread once it’s started. It’s expensive to discard and replace rusty tools, and it’s dangerous if one breaks or malfunctions mid-use.

Proper cleaning and storage of your tools is compulsory.

Proper Cleaning & Storage of Hand Tools

Hand tools are a necessity for most home projects, yardwork, etc. To keep them in great shape, proper cleaning, maintenance, and storage are key.

To properly clean hand tools:

  • Wipe down. Take an old towel or rag, wipe off any debris, dust, or grease left over from the previous use.
  • Spot check for damage. After wiping down the tool, give it a once-over for any signs of damage. You’re specifically looking for cracks, breaks, splinters, or corrosion that may cause harm during use or diminish the tool’s effectiveness. If you notice any of these indicators, set the tool aside until you can repair or replace it.
  • Use a grinder for striking tools. Any striking tool with a metal head is going to eventually form a ridge that will spread and form a thin ridge at the edge. Over time, this ridge can become susceptible to breakage. Use a grinder to grind off any edges.
  • Lubricate tools. Once all your tools have been cleaned, dried, and checked for damage, it’s not a bad idea to lubricate the tools with an all-purpose oil (avoid getting any on the handle). This is one way to help prevent tool rust and corrosion.

It’s important not to stop there. Storing your tools right will keep them functional for the long-haul. This goes for all hand tools, but garden tools especially seen to be prone to rust and corrosion because they are often digging in dirt, debris, and moisture and then sometimes left on the ground.

Once you clean and lubricate your tools, you’ll probably be tossing them back in a toolbox. Plastabs are great for this scenario because they’re nearly paper-thin, small rectangles that can simply be tossed into the top and bottom compartments. They’re made with a special vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) formula that releases a molecular layer of protection against corrosion for as long as the box is closed. The VCI protectant is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and harmless. Open the toolbox, and the VCI simply dissipates harmlessly into the air – while your tools are kept in top shape.

(In addition to tool boxes, plastabs can be used in tackle boxes, pistol cases, ammo boxes, control boxes, and enclosure cabinets – providing up to two years of protection against rust and corrosion.)

Contact Zerust for information on VCI products to help with electronics corrosion prevention by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

How to Remove Rust From Tools, HomeDepot.com

More Blog Entries:

Preventing Electronics Corrosion on Computers, Integrated Circuits, and Microchips, Jan. 21, 2022, Tool Rust Prevention Blog

Bicycle cover rust prevention

Beat Bike Rust With the Right Bicycle Cover

For a long time, biking was eyed skeptically as a kid thing, an urban thing, a 20-something thing, a performance athlete thing, a guy thing, a warm weather thing. The stereotypes go on for days, but they’re being successfully challenged with increasing diversity among riders and growing awareness of how regular cycling benefits our health, air quality, wallets, and road safety. But regardless of their reason for riding, all cyclists share a common adversary: Rust. Pedaling past the rust risk is a challenge for seasoned and amateur cyclists alike. This is especially true if you’re storing your wheels outdoors or in a garage that isn’t temperature-controlled. Choosing the right bicycle cover is essential. best bicycle cover

According to Bicycle Guider, biking popularity has shot up 47 percent in the U.S. during the last decade. In cities, ridership is up 73 percent. Americans spend $81 billion on biking every year – the bulk of that on just the bikes themselves. The average road bike costs somewhere between $350 to $700. Mountain bike price tags easily top $1,000. Even kid bikes are in the neighborhood of about $150 a pop. Bicycle rust can quickly eat up that investment.

Why Are Bicycles Prone to Rust?

Bicycles have a lot of metal components, from chains and frames to wheels and gears. Anytime iron-based metals are met with oxygen and moisture, it triggers a chemical chain reaction that results in rust. Factors like sweat, salt, mud, dirt, and debris are only going to speed up the metal degradation process.

Rust is a very specific type of corrosion that occurs only with iron and its alloys. Many bikes are made with at least some steel components, and steel is an iron alloy. But different metals can be vulnerable to similar types of corrosion, particularly when left outdoors.

Bicycles are routinely exposed to corrosive elements every time they’re taken out for a spin. Even small dints and dents can rapidly spread into a larger corrosion issue, potentially one that results in irreversible damage. Often, it doesn’t start out too bad, but rust can be tough to remove once it takes hold. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Bicycle Cover Rust PreventionMajor problems can be largely circumvented by regular cleaning and drying – and proper storage. Ideally, bikes are stored in a clean, dry, temperature-controlled space. A bicycle cover adds an extra layer of protection – which is especially important if you keep your ride outdoors. Leaving your bicycle exposed or outside for a day or so probably isn’t going to do major damage. But stretch to a week or more, and you’re likely to start seeing some signs of corrosion.

But even in a garage, the right bicycle cover can protect a bike from rust and corrosion. The wrong bicycle cover can actually make matters worse.

Choosing the Right Bicycle Cover

Rust ruins more than your bike’s aesthetic. It can render it un-rideable. It can happen faster than you think, particularly if you’re using the wrong bicycle cover.

Some bike covers are advertised to be waterproof, etc. The problem with many of these covers is condensation. This buildup of moisture can trigger the corrosive process. Sometimes, this can be an issue even if your bicycle is dry when you store it. Fluctuation of temperatures can result in a buildup of condensation inside the bike cover, hastening the degeneration of metal mechanisms.

This is where Zerust bicycle covers can make a difference. Not only are they water resistant and mold-proof, but the fabric is constructed with VCI technology. VCI stands for vapor corrosion inhibitor, and it’s the same technology our military uses to stretch the life of its metal machinery. The bike rolls easily into the cover and is zipped. The VCI molecules attach to the metal elements of the bicycle, protecting them from corrosion. This is particularly valuable not just for the frame, but the gears, brakes, and shifters. The VCI stays active for a full five years.

We offer several storage options for cyclists, including zip and non-zip as well as covers that fit tandem bikes. If you have questions, we’re happy to help answer them.

Contact Zerust for information on bicycle covers and bike rust prevention by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

What Happens When You Store Your Bike Outside, Oct. 6, 2021, By Caitlin Na Giddings, Bicycling.com

More Blog Entries:

You Got a Bike! Now Protect it With an Anti-Rust Bicycle Cover, Oct. 15, 2021, Zerust Bicycle Cover Blog

ice skate covers

Ice Skate Covers Keep Blades Sharp, Rust-Free

Olympic figure skating is graceful, precise, and stunning – and easily one of the most popular winter sports, captivating global audiences every four years. Even though most skating enthusiasts don’t skate their way onto an elite international stage, ice skating does draw more than 10 million people to rinks nationwide. That includes everyone over the age of 6 not only participating in figure skating, but speed skating, ice hockey, and recreational skating. As anyone who’s ever invested in a pair of skates knows, keeping them sharp is an imperative. The right ice skate covers can help shield the blades from the dulling effects of rust and corrosion.

Avid skaters recognize that a decent pair of figure skates is going to impact both performance and safety. Skaters need clean, knife-edged blades to ensure smooth, fast glides and sharp, crisp edges. Any amount of rust on a blade is inevitably going to dull one’s performance while wearing them. Rusty skates are risky skates whether you’re a beginner just learning proper techniques or an experienced ice skater pushing the boundaries of your skill.

Not all blade damage is immediately visible, either. In fact, one of the earliest indicators of a problem is the skater falling or struggling more than usual to complete a certain move or task. Rust prevention is preferred, which is where Zerust ice skate covers come in.Skate Guard Covers

Optimal Ice Skate Care & Keeping

Figure skating is undoubtedly one of the most glamorous sports, but it’s not cheap. In addition to the investment in costumes, there are private coaches, travel, sometimes physical therapy, and (of course) the skates. Even at the amateur level, decent skates can cost somewhere between $300 and $500. Ice hockey is a similar investment – around $7,000 a year, by some estimates.

One of the fastest ways to junk your blades is to let them fall victim to rust. The good news is that stretching their lifespan doesn’t need to cost a fortune.

Rust creeps up on ice skates when blades are left wet or subject to moisture. Ensuring skates are dry after each practice, game, or skate session is important. Keep a clean, soft, dry cloth in your gym bag or hockey bag specifically to wipe down your skate blades after you get off the ice and before you toss them in a bag to take them home.

Skate Guard CoversKeep in mind, however, that even after wiping them off there’s still a good chance they’re going to “mist up.” That’s because the temperature of the blade right after it’s been on the ice is cooler than the air around them. You’ll probably notice the tiny droplets forming on your blades. While most ice skating rinks do have dehumidifiers, there is still inevitably going to be moisture in the air. That’s why we recommend using ice skate covers (also known as “soakers”) right away, as soon as you wipe down your blades until you’re ready to lace them back up again. (Skate guards, made of harder, more durable material, are worn to shield blades when you’re walking across hard surfaces other than ice. Ice skates should not be stored in guards, but rather in the softer material.)

As for storage, you want to keep your skates in a cool, dry place – ideally one with controlled temperatures. Rapid rising and falling temperatures, sometimes referred to as thermal cycling, can put stress on the metal itself. But the bigger problem usually for ice skates is the build-up of condensation that can kick-start corrosion. Condensation happens when there’s more moisture than the air can hold. Warm air holds more moisture than cold air. As warm air cools, it reaches saturation and water droplets form. This tends to be more problematic in regions where the temperature frequently falls below 35 degrees. Not coincidentally, this tends to be where the majority of ice skating rinks are concentrated.

VCI ice skate covers keep your skate blades clean and dry while they are in your bag or hung up in your garage or closet. They help not only protect the blades from damage from being jostled about (especially against each other), but also shield against the corrosive impact of moisture. Zerust Skate Guard Covers cost just $10 and are engineered for the express purpose of blocking blade rust and corrosion for up to five years.

Slipping easily over the blades, these covers extend the life of your skates through vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) technology woven into the fabric. Zerust VCI works by releasing non-toxic, odorless, colorless vapor into the air. Molecules of this protective compound settle on metal surfaces, forming an invisible layer of protection that prevents the natural, electrochemical reactions that would typically happen on metal that meets moisture. Surfaces that are exposed to ice, water, or just moisture in the air are going to be protected from rust, tarnish, and corrosion.

Note: There are lots of cutesy, fluffy soakers for sale, but most of these are NOT made with VCI technology that will actually keep your blades rust-free and in good working condition. They may even cause more harm than good by trapping condensation moisture inside. Steer clear.

When you use VCI ice skate covers every time you store them, you ensure maximum protection. You can even wear them when walking on hard surfaces other than the ice, which helps you skate past the sort of scratches and dents that can make metals vulnerable to corrosion and rust.

Contact Zerust for more information on ice skate rust prevention, email or call us at (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Get Started, U.S. Figure Skating

More Blog Entries:

Zerust Hockey Skate Blade Covers Keep Rust From Dulling Your Edge, Dec. 15, 2019, Zerust Ice Skate Soakers Blog

Preventing electronics corrosion

Preventing Electronics Corrosion on Computers, Integrated Circuits, and Microchips

Electronics corrosion can occur in integrated circuits, microchips, lighting systems, PCB assemblies, marine equipment, and computers – all of which are broadly used and routinely exposed to potentially destructive environmental conditions. Corrosion can be costly and potentially dangerous for individuals, small businesses, and property owners who rely on these electronic systems being in good  working order at all times. Fortunately, there are simple, inexpensive ways to prevent electronics corrosion – namely, VCI anti-tarnish capsules.

But first, let’s talk about the science behind electronics corrosion. Corrosion is the gradual breakdown of material (typically metal) as a result of some chemical reaction with the environment. One of the most common forms of corrosion is called rust, which occurs when the metal iron (or its alloys, such as steel) meets with oxygen and water or moisture. The result is iron oxide, more commonly known as rust.

As anti-corrosion specialists, we recognize that many electronic devices have complex designs and numerous components that are vulnerable to corrosion. However, it’s not typically “rust” that’s occurring. That’s because electronics tend to be made of other types of metal besides iron or iron alloys. Most are made with materials like copper, lithium, tin, silver, gold, nickel, and aluminum. To be clear: These metals can certainly be vulnerable to water and moisture corrosion, but it’s not the exact same as “rust” because that is a specific chemical process dealing with iron. But what’s equally a problem with metal components is something called galvanic corrosion. This is corrosive damage caused by one reactive metal’s proximity to/interactions with other dissimilar metals.

Electronics that are notorious for all kinds of corrosion issues are:

  • Integrated circuits (ICs)
  • Printed circuit boards (PCB)
  • Switches
  • Magnetic Recording Media (Hard disc)
  • Packaging and Shielding Parts

Although corrosion has been an issue for electronics just as long as they’ve been around, we’re hearing more about it because as a society, we’re using electronics more than ever before. Not only that, but there’s a high expectation that all of our electronic devices will be reliable under almost all conditions. Corrosion threatens functional reliability – and it can happen very quickly. This is especially true considering the growing trend toward miniaturization (the sizing of electronics has decreased by a factor of 10 over just the last few years). The result is that potentially reactive metals are placed in even closer proximity to each other, heightening the galvanic corrosion risk. Also with smaller devices, we see huge damage with seemingly small environmental impacts. Just a little exposure to water or slight exposure to reactive metal and the whole thing malfunctions.

All of this makes preventative measures – particularly those that are easy and inexpensive – a smart protection of your investment.

car cover car rust prevention

Keep Your Car Rust Free With a Corrosion-Fighting Car Cover

Rust is a silent killer of cars, inconspicuously creeping in, concealing its calamitous presence in the undercarriage, door frame, and internal mechanics. Understanding top car rust myths – and taking appropriate action when cleaning and storing your coupe – can help you steer clear of the worst impacts vehicle corrosion.

Before we get rolling on the myths and misconceptions about vehicle rust it’s important to explain why cars get rusty in the first place. As our car rust prevention experts can explain, rust is the electrochemical process of iron-based metals breaking down due to exposure to water (or even just moisture) and oxygen. This occurs in virtually all cars, even newer models, despite advances in outer coatings and the use of alloys as opposed to pure iron. But anything containing iron (including steel, a common component in cars) is going to rust eventually. The question is, how long can you prolong that reality? Answer: Quite a long time, if you’re cautious and using the right cleaning processes and storage tools.

Regular and thorough cleaning AND drying, as well as the use of a rust prevention car cover, can go a long way.

Most Common Car Rust Myths

  • Myth No. 1: Vehicle rust is usually visible. Unfortunately, oxidation (the chemical process that causes rust) frequently occurs in the areas of a vehicle that aren’t blatantly obvious. People are often concerned about how rust will impact the look of the car, but that doesn’t typically happen until the later stages. Early signs of rust – the point at which mitigating it is most effective – often go unnoticed, particularly on the undercarriage and inner components, which are some of the most vulnerable. Once rust sets in, car owners are faced with some potentially expensive solutions for getting rid of it. It’s always better to approach with a preventative solution.
  • Myth No. 2: Newer cars won’t rust. If you’re comparing cars made today to those produced decades ago, then yes, modern cars have an advantage when it comes to corrosion. (Cheap cars made in the 1970s started to rust almost as soon as they hit the docks. Owners of classic cars have to be especially careful when it comes to automobile rust prevention.)  However, that doesn’t mean newer cars are immune. Many newer models on the market are manufactured with a layer of plastic around the chassis, but this is primarily to improve fuel economy and reduce wind resistance. What it won’t do is block moisture and dirt from worming their way into the undercarriage and other components. That creates a perfect environment for rust and other forms of corrosion to take hold.
  • Myth No. 3: Regular car washing makes a vehicle more prone to rust. We think this misconception arose from the notion that high-pressure water and/or harsh chemical cleaners might cause damage to paint, increasing the car’s vulnerability to corrosion. The reality is that when you wash the car, you’re clearing out the dirt and other impurities that can accelerate metal corrosion over time. This is especially true in northern states during the winter months, when salt covers the roads, as a build up of salt can hasten the rust process. Because this is a particular problem with the undercarriage, be sure to wash underneath your car with either a pressure washer or in an automatic car wash. (And don’t put any type of car cover on your vehicle until it’s fully dried, as this can trap moisture inside, potentially kick-starting the rust process.)
  • Myth No. 4: Car rust risk is the same no matter where you live. Although it’s true that there is the potential for rust no matter where you’re parked, the reality is there are some climates where vehicles are more vulnerable to oxidation. Exposure to moisture is a big factor. That’s why your car is more likely to develop rust in Louisiana than Nevada. An aggravating factor in the corrosion process is salt., which boosts water’s ability to carry electrons. If you live on the coast, your vehicle is going to be at higher risk of rust than someone living further inland (assuming the latter isn’t exposed to copious amounts of road salt in the winter; road de-icers are known to cause $3 billion annually in vehicle rust costs).
  • Myth No. 5: Cars kept in garages or under car covers won’t rust. Garages do help protect vehicles from many of the external pollutants to which they may otherwise be exposed if parked on the driveway, street, or parking lot. But garages aren’t necessarily a shield-all. Neither are car covers, for that matter. The bigger factor is ensuring the car is both clean and dry when it goes into storage. You also want to limit the amount of moist air to which the vehicle is exposed while in storage. We recommend using a Zerust car cover – whether in a garage or elsewhere – because it not only protects against the elements, but the chemical rusting process as well.

prevent car rust car coverMany factors play into how fast a car will rust, including which iron alloy components are used, the thickness of those materials, the local climate, and the degree of care one puts into cleaning and storage. Vehicle owners can slow the process considerably by washing their car regularly, drying it thoroughly and keeping it parked in a cool, dry space. Lots of car coverings will offer some degree of protection against sun, water, and dust, but only Zerust car covers with vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) technology effectively protect against rust and corrosion without expensive anti-rust treatments. We offer four different sizes – lined or unlined – priced between $250 and $400, each offering a full five years of active, anti-rust protection.

If you have questions about our car covers or the best size fit for your vehicle, our dedicated rust prevention specialists are available with prompt answers.

Contact Zerust for information on car covers and information on preventing classic car rust by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

How to Prevent and Remove Rust on Your Car Like a Pro, Jan. 10, 2022, By Ben Wojdyla, Popular Mechanic

More Blog Entries:

Zerust Car Covers Help Prevent Undercarriage Rust, March 12, 2021, VCI Car Cover Rust Prevention Blog

Tips for Shopping the Best ATV Cover

Shopping for the Best ATV Cover

All terrain vehicles, also known as ATVs, light utility vehicles, quad bikes or just quads, sell for anywhere between $3,000 to $25,000. If you’re thinking of buying an ATV, you should also be considering how to cover it up when you’re not riding so you can protect your investment. The best ATV cover is one that is properly-sized, durable, water resistant, and provides specific protection against rust and corrosion.

ATVs have gained enormous popularity in recent years. With their low-pressure tires, high torque, and ability to adroitly navigate rugged terrains, they’re a great deal of fun, but they’re also increasingly used for a broad range of utility applications. With already more than 1.2 million ATV owners in the U.S.,  ATV sales are expected to climb by 7 percent between now and 2027, according to Global Market Insights.Best ATV cover

While an ATV is nothing if not tough, it still requires TLC, just like any other vehicle. In fact, because it’s so frequently put through the paces in the harsh elements, it may require even more meticulous care than the average engine. Failure to properly clean your ATV (including the undercarriage) and store it can cause it to rapidly deteriorate. It will need more maintenance and a faster replacement. Whether you are going to keep your quad indoors or store it outside, it’s imperative to find the best ATV cover.

Some must-haves:best ATV cover

  • Durable material. Your cover needs to protect your four-wheeler from the corrosive impact of elements like snow, salt, sand, rain, sun, wind, and dirt/debris. Prolonged exposure to any of these elements can ruin seats, cables, grips, tires, and electrical components. If your ATV is left out in the rain, it won’t be long before excessive condensation causes corrosion to creep up – sometimes in places you won’t notice it immediately, such as in the gas tank. Having an ATV cover that is durable is going to ensure the damaging elements stay out. Another reason it’s smart to have a durable cover is so that you aren’t constantly replacing it. You can probably find a dirt-cheap cover, but if you have to replace it every year or every few months, you aren’t saving all that much. In fact, you could be losing money because of the risk of greater damage to your ride.
  • Adequate sizing. The best ATV cover is going to be one that fully covers your ride – even the undercarriage – but isn’t oversized, allowing moisture to seep inside. This not only helps ensure the elements stay out, but that prying eyes can’t take a peak inside. Vandals and thieves are almost always going to go for the low-hanging fruit. An ATV that is fully concealed is not only harder to remove, it isn’t easy to see the make/model or the shape it’s in – details that may otherwise help a would-be thief determine what’s necessary to haul it off quickly.
  • Breathable material. You want the material to be water resistant, but the best ATV cover is also going to be breathable to prevent moisture from building up inside. If you use just a standard, plastic cover, you’re going to be unpleasantly surprised by mildew, rust, and other forms of corrosion.
  • UV protection. If your ATV is going to be primarily stored outdoors, your ATV cover should be one that shields against the sun’s potentially damaging rays. Both the heat and the light can contribute to weakening or breaking down of fabrics, rubber, and even metal components of any vehicle.
  • Rust prevention. Very few ATV covers specifically protect against rust and corrosion, but it really is essential. Most metals have the potential to corrode when exposed to air and water/moisture. ATVs are made to be used in the mud and muck, so there’s little keeping them entirely clean and dry at all times. But it’s not enough to simply give it a thorough clean and dry afterward (though doing so is important). The trick is to use an ATV cover with vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) technology to shield against rust at the molecular level, so long as the vehicle is enclosed inside. As soon as the cover is opened, the VCI particles simply dissipate harmlessly into the air.

If you already have an ATV or have just received one as a gift or are planning to purchase one in the near future, give some thought too to your storage solutions, including the best ATV cover.

Contact Zerust for information on an ATV rust cover and ATV rust prevention by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation in the United States and its Regions and States: An Update National Report from the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE), Feb. 2008, U.S. Department of Agriculture

More Blog Entries:

ATV Rust Prevention Better Than Tackling After the Fact, June 14, 2020,  Best ATV Cover Blog

gun rust-free

Keeping Your New Gun Rust-Free

The upward trend of gun purchases is greater than ever this holiday season (which coincides with hunting season). Although lacking in any official national sales tally, we do know background checks by the FBI’s NICS reached 21 million nationally last year. The National Shooting Sports Foundation reports 2021 is shaping up to be the second-highest gun sales year in history, just behind 2020. If you receive a new gun as a gift, it’s important to take care of it properly to ensure it lasts for years to come – and functions correctly each time. Keeping your gun rust-free is an essential part of firearm care – and safety.

“A rusted gun is a dangerous gun,” explained Zerust Consumer Products CEO Budd Dworkin. “Unfortunately, people too often underestimate how quickly rust can creep into the crevices and cause major problems, ones that may not even be blatantly visible. As rust prevention experts, we take this very seriously, which is why we offer numerous solutions that will work for just about every type of firearm – and firearm owner.”

Rust is the union of oxygen + moisture + metal (specifically, iron and its alloys). Other types of metal can be similarly corroded, but it’s only iron metals, which include steel, stainless steel, cast iron, wrought iron, ferrochrome, elinvar, and kovar, that are technically considered “rust.”  With firearms, it can eat away at the metal components, resulting in a range of problems going beyond mere discoloration.

The moving parts of a gun can be adversely impacted, particularly at the points of contact, where you may see more wear and reduced slide. If a magazine spring rusts, it could result in failure to feed. If the slide of a gun is rusted, there could be issues with failure to cycle, extract, or eject. In the barrel, rust can even cause potential explosion due to pressure.

rust prevention spray

Rust Prevention Spray On Solution Now Available to Retail Consumers

For years, business-to-business customers have been relying on Zerust’s Axxanol™ Spray-G as a rust prevention solution for heavy-duty protection in extreme weather and during overseas shipping. Now, the spray is available direct to consumers to protect items you’ll be storing outdoors (even in open air!) or in your garage. It’s also ideal for any cross-country or overseas shipments of metal materials.Zerust-Axxanol-Spray-G Sprayable Rust Prevention

The anti-rust spray has an oily grease consistency that helps ensure superior, long-term protection against rust and corrosion – even outdoors and under the most intense conditions. The spray shields metal equipment and parts stored outdoors for up to one year and indoors for up to 2 years. If it’s additionally stored in VCI (vapor corrosion inhibiting) cases or compartments, it will have maximum protection for years. It’s water-resistant, and manufactured to be compatible with most rubber and plastic surfaces, as well as paint and packaging materials.

Among its many upsides:

  • It’s easy to apply (and remove).
  • Saves time & costs associated with corrosion-related repair and replacement.
  • Doubles as a light lubricant, as well as corrosion prevention.
  • Offers the same protection of grease, but in a sprayable form that’s more convenient.

It can be cleaned off effortlessly with a simple alkaline cleaner. It is not corrosive, reactive or toxic.

Industrial consumers have utilized Axxanol™ Spray-G for protection of large metal equipment and components, particularly in factories and shipping. It’s been deemed a vital part in end-to-end sufficient supply chains, ensuring that commodities arrive at their destination in pristine condition. Products are sold to those customers in bulk pails and drums. But now, retail consumers can purchase the same protection in ready-to-use, 12 oz single aerosol cans.

Ideal application of this solvent-based corrosion protection is done at a temperature of 50 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Don some goggles and gloves, make sure the item is clean and dry, and then simply coat evenly and completely with a layer of spray. The equipment or item will be guarded against the destructive effects of moisture, humidity, and even metal interactions.

Any leftover anti-rust spray should be stored in a cool, dry place away from sunlight.

Examples of some of the items you can protect with this rust prevention spray:

  • Any item with iron, aluminum, or copper components.
  • Cars or trucks (particularly if they’re classics and/or you’re storing them for the winter).
  • Lawnmowers.
  • Chainsaws (particularly the bar and chain).
  • Table saws.
  • Any tools with iron, copper, or aluminum components that are stored outdoors, in a shed, or in a garage.
  • Boats.
  • Bicycles.
  • Motorcycles.
  • ATVs.
  • Snowmobiles.
  • Gardening equipment or tools.
  • Outdoor furniture (metal).
  • Grills & grilling tools.

The spray can be used in conjunction with other cases and covers, such as car covers, table saw covers, motorcycle covers, car covers, bicycle covers, and VCI capsules & polybags – for ultimate, long-term protection.

(It shouldn’t be used for firearms, though we do offer gun cleaner & gun oil that are made especially for this purpose and offer high-caliber protection no matter what you’re carrying.)

Axxanol™ Spray-G provides outstanding protection for your equipment in a range of climates, including coastal and industrial.

Questions about whether this formula is the right one for your vehicles, machines, or tools can be directed to our friendly customer service team at Zerust.

Contact Zerust by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

What to do about a rusty lawn mower,  Aug. 2017, 2018, By Jeanne Huber, The Washington Post

More Blog Entries:

Will My Tools Rust if I Store Them in My Garage? Aug. 26, 2021, Zerust Rust Prevention Spray Blog

motorcycle cover rust prevention

Choose a Motorcycle Cover That Shields Against the Insidious Forces of Rust & Corrosion

Few experiences are as riveting as a country road ride atop a roaring cruiser. Ensuring that ride can rumble on for years yet to come means taking motorcycle maintenance seriously – including being choosy when it comes to a motorcycle cover.

A basic motorcycle cover can act as a shield against the direct elements and debris exposure as well as theft. But it won’t stop Mother Nature from gripping hold with tarnish, corrosion, and rust on a bike that’s insufficiently protected. A motorcycle cover that lacks a vapor corrosion inhibitor (VCI) cover can potentially do more harm than good. The reason is a plain plastic, cloth or vinyl cover is going trap humidity and moisture underneath, acting as an accelerating agent to the rust process.

Motorcycle Metals That Rust

Rust is a specific type of corrosion that can occur when iron or iron alloys (also known as ferrous metals) interact with oxygen and moisture or humidity. Examples of ferrous metals frequently found in motorcycle manufacturing (past and present):

  • Cast iron. This material was long used for cylinder barrels on air-cooled motorcycle engines. For a time, it was also used for brake drums (now typically made of aluminum), though it can still be used as a brake shoe liner.
  • Malleable cast iron. This type of iron is tolerant of local stress concentrations and surface defects and can be easily made into thin hollow or ribbed sections.
  • Steel. This metal is still widely used in motorcycle manufacturing, and it comes in many grades and forms. Steel is an ideal option for many motorcycle parts, thanks to its hardness, strength, and heat resistance. It’s commonly seen on oil tanks, headlamp housings, mudguards, exhaust valves, camshafts, sprokets and gears.

It’s also worth noting that rust is just one type of corrosion. Other metals may be susceptible to different chemical process breakdowns when exposed to air and water – or even other metals.

Corrosion – including rust – can crop up very quickly and be incredibly difficult to tame once it rears its ugly head. This is especially true on motorcycles, which are often used roughly and regularly exposed directly to the harsh weather elements as well as other damaging materials like road salt, mud, and sweat. A few pebble-pocks may be all it takes to kickstart the corrosion process. The speed at which it spreads will depend on the climate you’re in and the storage situation, but it’s always going to be easier to prevent rust than to attempt tempering it after the fact.

anti-rust bicycle cover

You Got a Bike! Now Protect it With an Anti-Rust Bicycle Cover

Bicycle sales since the pandemic have been “off the chain,” and the trend shows no sign of slowing. To keep your wheels looking brand new in between rides, after a stretch in storage, or when traveling, it’s important to choose the best anti-rust bicycle cover.

The fact is that rust can absolutely destroy your bike to the point that it is no longer functional. More than likely, it won’t start out that bad, but it’s tough to remove rust once it begins to take hold.

Anytime oxygen, moisture, and iron metals meet, it causes a chemical breakdown known as rust. Salt, sweat, humidity, and muddy debris only serve to accelerate the corrosion process, quickly eating away at the core components of your bicycle until it does permanent damage.

Bicycles are susceptible to rust because of all the metal components, but also due to their regular outdoor use and occasional storage. Minor nicks on the frame can quickly devolve into a serious corrosion problem on the paint, body work and braking system. Not only can this cause unsightly spots and blistering paint, it can result in sticky bolts and cables and even a loosened frame.

Prevention is a much easier (and safer) alternative where corrosion is concerned. Winter is a great time to get in the habit (if you haven’t already) of implementing bicycle rust prevention strategies.

Here, our rust prevention experts offer some sure-fire ways to prevent your bicycle from rusting.

prevent table saw rust

Taming Table Saw Rust with Zerust Table Saw Cover

Table saws are must-have tools for many professionals and DIY-ers alike. A high-quality table saw blade is used to reduce time and effort in all sorts of projects requiring cross cuts, ripping cuts, and dado cuts. But any type of cut will be ineffective – possibly even hazardous – if you don’t do all you can to prevent table saw rust with a vapor corrosion-inhibiting table saw cover.

Table saw blades to a lot of work, subject to long hours withstanding high friction. The blades need to stay sharp and strong. Cheap blades are going to be more susceptible to warping, buckling, and slipping off-course. Investing in a good blade is going to ensure accuracy of each cut. They’ll also be more vulnerable to dulling faster. That’s never been more true than these days, given that the price of lumber has skyrocketed over the last year. That’s all the more reason buying the best blade is going to pay off.

But even the best blade isn’t immune to rust. Plus, many have platforms that are made of cast iron – durable, stable, and vibration-free, but in no way rust-resistant. In fact, it’s incredibly vulnerable to rust when exposed to any amount of humidity or moisture. Rust, or iron oxide, is the chemical reaction of iron (or its alloys) meeting oxygen and moisture. Different types of corrosion can happen with other kinds of metals contained in a table saw. 

A table saw can cost anywhere from $100 to $3,000 (with a decent model being closer to the higher end). If you don’t want to be replacing the blade – or entire platform – every few months or every other season, you would be wise to take the time to properly clean and store your table saw after each use. This minimizes the risk of pitting as well as rust damage.

One of the best ways to do that is with a table saw cover that incorporates vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) technology.

How Does VCI Prevent Table Saw Rust?

Not all table saw covers are created equally. If you purchase one that simply covers your unit, it will help reduce elements like sawdust, regular dust, dirt, oil, and paint – or whatever else is floating or flying around in your workshop that can be damaging when allowed to collect for a time. The problem is that such covers can also dangerously trap moisture inside. With no way out, it can actually accelerate the chemical processes of rust and corrosion.

Preventing table saw rust requires use of a cover that has vapor corrosion inhibiting technology woven right into the fabric. VCI has been used safely for decades in a variety of uses – from reducing the risk of military equipment rust to preventing corrosion of electronics shipped by large companies across the globe.

It works by releasing an odorless, colorless, non-toxic compound of protective molecules that attach to exposed metal surfaces. This layer of protection can’t be seen with the naked eye, but it blocks the chemical reactions that cause rust, tarnish, and other types of corrosion. The VCI works so long as the metal is kept in that enclosed space. When the cover is removed, those protective molecules dissipate harmlessly into the air.

Our table saw covers come in two different sizes, last up to five years, and protect not only against the obvious elements, but also those you can’t see (which can often cause the most damage).

In addition to the table saw cover, we have numerous rust inhibiting solutions for all your tools and hardware.

tool rust prevention

Will My Tools Rust if I Store Them in My Garage?

Rust is the bane of any tool owner’s existence, damaging the look and feel of the metal and ultimately inhibiting the tool’s effectiveness. Tool rust is a chemical process that can occur anytime the metal components interact with air and moisture. Garage storage is ideal for many tool owners because that’s where people often keep a work bench or space. But while garages, sheds or basements may provide basic shelter from the elements, they are not going to prevent rust entirely.

Hand tools may be especially susceptible to rust. This is partly because they contain so many metal components, but also because those components come directly into contact with skin oils and sweat. It is essential to be proactive about stopping rust before it can cause any damage to tools.

Ideal tool storage involves clean, dry tools, low humidity, cool, even temperatures, proper air circulation and the use of vapor corrosion inhibitors, such as drawer liners, plastabs, poly bags and vapor capsules.

classic car cover classic car rust

When a Patch of Classic Car Rust Nearly Ruins Retirement Plans

A classic car tells the tale of not just where we’re going, but where we’ve been. But the threat of classic car rust can put the brakes on that story. In the case of one disabled veteran who loves to take scenic rides in the right lane with his service animal, rust is threatening to potentially upend his remaining retirement.

According to the Las Cruces Sun News, the former combat vet/stuntman purchased a brand new Chevrolet El Camino in 1983 in a small Kentucky town. He named her Consuela, and she’s been his main mode of motor transport ever since. However, he’s hit a bump in the road since moving from Florida to New Mexico to try to register it – and rust is reportedly to blame.

The newspaper reports the motor vehicle division in his new home city can’t verify the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the car. The primary numbers are faded, but the secondary display, located on the frame of the car, is obscured by rust. There’s no sticker to verify the VIN on the dash, and the car was made before auto manufacturers were required to maintain onboard diagnostic VIN readers. He found the original purchase documents, but the city says that still doesn’t help him solve the VIN issue.

Although most classic car owners don’t typically share this same sort of headache, almost all are familiar with the risk of classic car rust.

Rust Prevention Motorcycle Cover Helps Keep Your Ride Rolling

The U.S. motorcycle industry roared into 2021, with reported sales up 33 percent from this time last year. Many new buyers are seeking more sources of outdoor recreation. But taking it outdoors means exposure to the elements, which means you run the risk of rust. Caring for a new motorcycle means ensuring not only that it’s regularly maintained but also properly stored. This is where a quality rust prevention motorcycle cover comes in.

Rust occurs when iron or iron alloy metals are exposed to both oxygen and moisture. This kicks off a natural process called oxidation, which is what can corrode the metal surfaces. Unless metal is somehow sealed or protected with vapor corrosion inhibitors (VCI), rust is inevitable. Corrosion can occur with other types of metals as well, though rust is specific to iron metals.

Motorcycles and motorcycle parts can rust or corrode when their metal parts get wet, have condensation, are snowed on or come into contact with any moisture. The process can be accelerated with exposure to elements like salt (on the road or in the air). This is why it’s so important not only to properly clean your motorcycle but also store it in a low-humidity environment. Using a VCI helps protect your bike not only from dirt and debris, but also from the chemical processes that cause rust and corrosion.

Prevent Home Gym Equipment Rust and Corrosion

It appears the home fitness boom is here to stay, which also means there are going to be many who will need to know how to prevent home gym equipment rust and corrosion.

When pandemic-related lockdowns took effect last year, the home fitness industry took off like wildfire, with people dropping dollars on everything from $20 yoga mats to $4,000 cardio machines. Revenue of home health equipment more than doubled. Sales of treadmills spiked nearly 140 percent. Stationary bike sales tripled. Such sales have endured through the seasons.

Usually when you are in the path of getting fit and eating better you change your diet a lot and sometimes we do not evaluate that this can either makes good or affect us in someway, for example do you know the side effects of methylcobalamin and how this can affect your body?

Methylcobalamin is used to treat vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 is important for the brain and nerves, and for the production of red blood cells. Methylcobalamin is sometimes used in people with pernicious anemia, diabetes, and other conditions. You can learn more about how your body is affected at the QCKinetix clinic.

Gym equipment rust and corrosion can occur in basements and garages under the right conditions, particularly in garages because they aren’t often sealed and insulated as well as other indoor structures. The two greatest catalysts for gym equipment rust are:

  • High humidity (including sweat).
  • Improper maintenance.

The good news is that rust of gym equipment, particularly weights, can be prevented with proper maintenance and storage.

Tube & Barrel Strip Helps Prevent Gun Barrel Rust

For firearm enthusiasts, rust is a four-letter word. Gun barrel rust may not be particularly unsightly (it’s probably not the first thing you’ll notice), but it can certainly impact the safety and performance of your firearm. Rust and debris inside the barrel results in a drastic pressure increase after a round is charged, causing a bulged or split barrel – or potentially even exploding the gun’s action.

Ensuring your gun is corrosion-free is pivotal. Proper cleaning and storage is key.

Keep in mind that each time you fire, residue is left in the barrel, chamber and action. That residue can build up over time. Failing to address it could result in a serious safety issue. Even new firearms need regular cleaning and maintenance.

Zerust tube and barrel strips are among the most effective means of firearm cleaning and gun barrel rust prevention.

bicycle rust cover

Stop Bicycle Rust and Corrosion in Its Tracks With Zerust Bicycle Cover

For many cyclists, a new bike is a major financial investment. You want to be certain your ride lasts for a long time, which means you need to take the threat of bicycle rust and corrosion seriously. Rust – or any form of corrosion – can shorten the lifespan of any bike.

Bicycle sales boomed last year during the pandemic, with urban ridership up 21 percent in the U.S. compared to the previous year. Rails-to-Trails conservancy reported a 110 percent uptick on rail-trail ridership last year too. Cycling allowed people to avoid public transportation and maintain social distance while also getting exercise. Although sales may have tapered off, many have fallen in love with cycling and global sales are estimated to top $83 billion by 2027.

Whether you’re an avid cyclist or only venture out for an occasional weekend spin, preserving the integrity of your bicycle’s components is an imperative to avoiding costly repairs and replacements. Proper cleaning, drying and storage of your ride is essential to preventing bicycle rust. As for storage, recognize that not all bicycle covers are created equal.

bait and tackle box rust prevention

Bait and Tackle Box Rust Prevention 101

Across the country, fishing is a family affair, with nearly 17 percent of people ages 6 and up angling at least once a year and most saying their primary enjoyment comes from spending time with loved ones. The experience can be far less enjoyable, though, if you reach into your bait and tackle box to find that rust has wormed its way in.

Rusty tackle is a headache most anglers want to avoid, as it typically requires replacing the affected pieces. The more efficient solution – financially and time-wise – is to find an effective means of bait and tackle box rust prevention.

Even if you only go fishing half a dozen times or so a year, you don’t want to be running to the tackle store every time before rowing out to the riverbank.
air conditioner cover

New AC Unit? Make Sure to Grab a New Air Conditioner Cover.

Air conditioner sales have been on a meteoric rise in recent years, with about 8.5 million new units sold in a single recent year. Central air units can cost between $1,500 and $10,000 or more (depending on the footprint of the home), and repairs to existing units aren’t cheap either. If you’re considering buying a new air conditioner or just wanting to take care of the unit you have, consider investing in a low-cost but effective system to protect it: An air conditioner cover.

Lots of folks who use air conditioning covers only think to do so in the fall or winter. There’s good reason to protect your unit during these seasons, but as our corrosion and rust prevention experts at Zerust can explain, having an air conditioner cover in the spring and summer months can be beneficial as well, particularly if you don’t have the unit running the whole time or are anticipating a summer storm.

Main Benefits of an Air Conditioner Cover

Although central air systems are built durably to withstand many elements, they aren’t weatherproof. In one study conducted by the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service at LSU, researchers found that homeowners on average saved $33 monthly by getting annual tune-ups of their air conditioners – and keeping them covered during inclement weather. That works out to about $400 a year. Ultimately, you could be extending the lifespan of your unit by years, potentially saving you thousands.

boat rust prevention

A Marine Must: Boat Rust Prevention With Vapor Capsules

A hull lot of new boat owners have a special interest in boat rust prevention this year.

Boating sales in the U.S. last year reached a 13-year record high, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association. Sales of recreational vessels are expected to remain at historic levels in 2021, with many manufacturers still scrambling to fill backorders from last year.

Whether you’ve got a personal watercraft, a wake boat, freshwater fishing boat or pontoon boat, schooner or later, you’ll need a plan to prevent rust and corrosion. These chemical processes are a threat to all types of vehicles, tools and electronics, but boats face unique risk. That’s because they are constantly exposed to the elements – water, in particular, and saltwater especially. Rust is a specific form of corrosion that occurs when oxygen meets iron meets moisture. Other chemical processes can cause other forms of equally damaging corrosion.

Corrosion damage can be very expensive to fix – and count on insurance help, either. As BoatUS Magazine notes, rust damage is rarely covered. Sometimes, insurers can fairly allege that even some accidents and cases of sunken boats are denied coverage because of the role corrosion played in the incident.

So you’re far from the first deckhand to face down possible rust-related boating blight. The U.S. Navy, for example, considers it a “$6 billion scourge.” But the military, just like many large auto makers and computer electronics suppliers, have all significantly reduced their losses on this front by employing something called vapor corrosion inhibiting technology (VCI). Now, it’s available to recreational vessel owners, and is highly effective at shielding boats from rust and corrosion damage while in storage.

Prevent Golf Club Rust With Zerust Vapor Capsules

Golf season is about to be in full swing! Whether you’ve just treated yourself a to shiny new set of clubs or are dusting off your trusty irons and wedges, it’s important that you care for them properly to prevent golf club rust so they’ll stay swinging for many more seasons to come.

Why Golf Clubs Rust

Golf clubs are made of all different kinds of metal, varying by brand, style, type and cost. Starter clubs are often made with zinc or aluminum. These are nice because they’re lightweight, but they usually won’t last more than a few years (longer if you take care of them). These substances won’t rust (only iron and iron alloys do that), but they can be reactive to water and oxygen and they can corrode. Steel and stainless steel is usually the next level up. These are strong metals, but they do contain iron and they can be susceptible to rust. There is also maraging metal, which is stainless steel that’s been put through a special hardening process. It’s popular for faceplates in high-performing woods or in low-profile fairway woods and utility irons. It can be vulnerable to rust and corrosion. Finally, there is titanium. Some of the priciest clubs are made with titanium. Pure titanium is incredibly rust and corrosion proof, but pure titanium anything is hard to find. Most titanium golf clubs are actually made with titanium alloys, meaning they’re still potentially susceptible to corrosion.

Of course, you might still technically be able to golf if there is a bit of rust on the face of the club, but it is a common myth that it will increase your spin rate. Despite what pro golfer Bobby Jones once said about the advantage of “a bit” of rust and slight pitting boosting his backspin, independent research has proven there isn’t any performance advantage to having rusty wedges. In fact, it might actually lower the effectiveness of the club grooves and decrease the amount of ball-to-face contact.

The other issue is that once rust develops, it rarely stops at “just a bit.” Rust on the club shaft can be extremely detrimental. In fact, it’s the top cause of golf club breakage.

undercarriage rust

Zerust Car Covers Help Prevent Undercarriage Rust

Many motorists are so fixated on keeping their car clean that they overlook the risk of undercarriage rust. The irony is that most people wash their vehicle not just to make it look nice but to clear it of corrosive elements like dirt and salt. But wash the undercarriage the wrong way – with indiscriminate high pressure and harsh chemicals – and your vehicle could be more prone to undercarriage rust.

Rust is a chemical process that occur when metal meets oxygen meets water. Rust is specific to ferrous metals (iron and its alloys) but corrosion can happen with all different types of metals, precipitated or accelerated by certain compounds. Salt and chemicals used to deice roads are a good example.  (In fact, Phillips Industries, an electrical products manufacturer for the commercial vehicle industry, reports an uptick of corrosion from deicing compounds magnesium chloride and calcium, which are effective in clearing road ice but are 50 percent smaller than road salt rocks, so it’s easier for them to wedge their way into tighter spots.)

For this reason, it’s important to make sure your car – particularly if you’ve got an antique, classic or valuable sports car – is cleaned and dried properly before parking or storing it. When your vehicle is in storage, a Zerust car cover provides the ultimate protection against undercarriage rust.

Wash This Way

Even professional washes and detailing can put the metal frame at risk. Routine washing does lower the potential for buildup of chemicals, mud and grime. However, our rust prevention experts understand that it’s imperative for vehicles and undercarriages to be washed the right way – and with the right cleaning agents.

In particular, pressure washing can be especially hazardous. Undercarriages appear to be strong and sturdy, but they are not impervious to damage by pressurized water. If the pressure stream is too high – and especially if it’s directed toward sealed components – it can push out or past protective material or gaskets of Gorilla Gasket, meant to prevent rust and corrosion. In case of any accident like the ones explained in the post you can easily contact this legal firm for professional help.

If you must have your car pressure washed, take special care to avoid any electrical connections. If you accidentally force water into open connections on the electrical system where it can’t escape, you’re risking immediate damage but also long-term undercarriage corrosion.  Don’t point the spray directly at any pinion, breather, wheel seal or input/output. To do so is to risk pushing contaminants into and past the seal lips.

Also, don’t use harsh chemicals, detergents, degreasers or anything that has acids in it. Mild cleaners can get the job done and won’t wreak havoc on the metal. And don’t leave any soap behind on electrical connections.

Choosing the Risk Car Cover to Prevent Undercarriage Rust

Even the most affordable sports car is likely to be an investment of at least $30,000 or so. If you’re going to take the care to wash it meticulously, storing it with care is the next logical step.

You can find all kinds of cheap car covers that will generally do fine to block out the sun and keep out major dust build-up. The problem is these can do more harm than good when it comes to rust because they trap tiny droplets of moisture inside, causing corrosion while your car is covered up. Zerust covers are different because they are made with a special vapor corrosion inhibiting lining that is not only water resistant and mold-proof, it’s also rust-inhibiting. They’re also made to be driven onto (rather than just be tossed over the top) so they provide direct, constant protection to the undercarriage.

Keep in mind that even if you have a newer vehicle that is built to better withstand corrosive elements, nothing made with metal is corrosion-proof.

Zerust car covers protect your vehicle for a full five years after the date of purchase, keeping your whole vehicle in the best shape possible for your next spin – and many more to come!

Contact Zerust for information on car covers and information on preventing classic car rust by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

How washing a truck can lead to corrosion, March 12, 2021, Truck Parts Service

More Blog Entries:

Car Rust Prevention: Car Care During Coronavirus, April 14, 2021, Zerust Car Covers Blog

tool rust prevention

Top 3 Tool Rust Prevention Strategies from Zerust

Home improvement tools – like the renovations they help make a reality – are investments. Tool rust prevention doesn’t have to be pricey, but it is necessary if you hope to use those saw blades, drill bits, plies and hammers more than a few times.

Home improvement spending has been off the charts in recent years, growing by double the rate of the rest of the retail sector even before the COVID-19 pandemic spurred a boom of renovations over the past year. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau found home improvement-related retail sales grew nearly 12 percent last year, even as overall retail sells fell by about 4 percent. One study by Consumer Specialists revealed that in the last year, an increasing number of homeowners were planning or in the midst of home renovations, many involving bathrooms, kitchens and landscaping/gardening.

Projects like these can’t be completed without the proper tools – and few are dirt cheap. Tools, like renovations, are investments, and they require care to ensure they don’t become. Here, we offer our Top 3 Tool Rust Prevention Strategies from Zerust.

prevent mountain bike rust

Prevent Mountain Bike Rust From Ruining Your Ride

Mountain bikes are designed to take some punishment and navigate rough terrain. But all cyclists will find their ride remains vulnerable to rust and corrosion if they aren’t careful, ultimately shortening its lifespan. With proper maintenance – and the right bicycle cover – you can prevent mountain bike rust and keep your wheels rolling for years to come.

It should be noted that rust is specific to iron and its alloys (such as steel). Rust is just one form of corrosion. Corrosion can impact a broad range of metals, including aluminum (a key material in the manufacturing of many mountain bikes). Both are chemical reactions, primarily involving a meeting of metal, moisture and oxygen. The process over time will cause degradation of metals. That’s bad news on a bike, where every component is critical for smooth operation.

Although there are thousands of online articles about how to remove bike rust once it’s taken hold, the fact is it’s much more cost effective to prevent it if possible. Here are some expert tips on preventing mountain bike rust.

RV tool rust prevention

On the Road: Tool Rust Prevention for Full-Time RV Life

Tool rust prevention is essential for the growing number of individuals, couples, families and digital nomads are ditching “sticks and bricks” homes for full-time RV life.

According to the RV Industry Association, manufacturer RV shipments increased 44 percent in 2020 over 2019, and survey data indicates the demand is likely to continue, with more than 60 million Americans planning to take at least one RV trip in the next 12 months.

Whether you are a newbie, a part-timer, a full-timer or a snowbird, one thing that can’t be overstated is the importance of your tools. Things like pliers, wrenches, ladders, flashlights, knives, socket sets and more – all essential to road life. But pretty much all tools with metal components are vulnerable to rust and corrosion – especially when they’re in and out of storage and routinely exposed to sweat, humidity and moisture.

Campers and recreational vehicles of any size are essentially traps for humidity because of the compact living quarters. Many don’t come standard with significant insulation, either. Any time your metal tools are exposed to air and humidity, you run he risk of rust and corrosion. The same goes for things like cast iron skillets, propane tanks, boating equipment, fishing and tackle gear, electronics, bicycles and other items you may use frequently on the road.

The risk is even more outsized if you spend a considerable time boondocking (dry camping) because your equipment is more likely to meet the direct impact of the elements.

prevent sports equipment rust

Prevent Sports Equipment Rust With VCI Technology

The year 2020 will be remembered for many things, but hopefully a few of those – like the new fitness regimes so many adopted – will be positive. With gyms, yoga centers and other fitness centers shuttered for extended periods over the year, many invested in apps, as well as at-home gym and sports equipment. If any of those with metal components have been placed in storage for the time being, you’ll want to ensure they’re protected. You can prevent sports equipment rust and corrosion with VCI technology.

Of course you know that any metal has the potential to be susceptible to rust (if ferrous) or corrosion (if non-ferrous). Both are chemical reactions typically caused when metal elements are exposed to oxygen and water or humidity. Most fitness equipment is made of aluminum, carbon steel or some other metal alloy. That’s a mix of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, but both can be prone to corrosive damage under the right conditions.

Sporting goods are often even more susceptible to rust and corrosion because of a fourth element: Salt. Specifically, the salt contained in sweat. This is why you’ll notice damage to certain elements of your workout equipment faster than others. (Handles and keyboards on treadmills, ellipticals, weights and spin bikes are especially exposed – even if you wear workout gloves.) If you’re located on a coast, the damage can be accelerated. Sunlight, too, can exacerbate corrosion issues, as can quick variations in temperature. If equipment is stored outdoors or in a garage or in a damp basement, expect the damage to happen faster.

motorcycle cover

Motorcycle Rust Prevention: Why Motorcycle Covers are Essential

Anyone who owns a motorcycle or is shopping for one recognizes that motorcycles require some basic maintenance. What many aren’t sure about is whether motorcycle covers are worth the investment. After all, many cars sit out in the elements for a time and seem fine. But motorcycle covers should be considered by owners to be basic maintenance.

Aside from the obvious theft risk that covers can help mitigate, it’s important to note is that motorcycle components are much more exposed than those of other types of vehicles. Bikes that are stored outdoors are obviously susceptible to UV damage, dust and moisture from rain, snow or fog. Those that are stored indoors are not immune from damage, rust and other corrosion, particularly dust and moisture.

So motorcycle covers are absolutely worth it. But not all are created equal. A motorcycle cover that does nothing else but provide a cover may keep dust at bay, but it won’t shield your ride against moisture. This can leave it susceptible to rust – particularly in those areas that aren’t immediately visible. Ultimately, the cost of a motorcycle cover doesn’t compare to the price of damage that may be caused by not having one.

Prevent garden tool rust

Prevent Garden Tool Rust in Prepping for Winter Storage

The home gardening “bloom” of 2020 coincided with widespread COVID-19 lockdowns. Gardening is a soothing, family-friendly hobby and a means to ease food security concerns when resources are tight. If you’re one of those who jumped on the tillage train – and want to keep doing so – it’s important to prevent garden tool rust in prepping your supplies for winter storage.

Properly preparing and storing your garden supplies in the winter is critical to preventing rust and corrosion. Corrosion occurs when a refined metal is gradually destroyed by chemical and/or electrochemical reactions in their environment. Iron and iron alloys (of which many gardening tools are made) are susceptible to a specific type of corrosion called rust when exposed to moisture/humidity and oxygen. Other types of corrosion can occur to tools made of metal, brass, aluminum and chromium. If you do not have the required time or attention to take good care of your tools, consider hiring experts like winston-salem lawn mowing which will come cheaper than replacing tools every once and a while.

Zerust has a number of solutions to prevent garden tool rust and corrosion for those hoping to avoid the unpleasant surprise of discovering degraded tools when they pull them out from the shed for next season.

Winter Tackle Box Rust Prevention With VCI Capsules, Plastabs & Poly Bags

There are (incredibly) those who think fishing is nothing more than casting money into the water. Those of us who love it are of a different mind – but we aren’t trying to waste a dollar either. Experienced anglers know it’s smart to winterize your boat, rods, reels and lures – and plan a tackle box rust prevention strategy for storage too while you’re at it.

‘Gone Fishing’

Fishing has become an increasingly popular sport and hobby in recent years. The 2018 Special Report on Fishing by The Outdoor Foundation that in 2017, nearly 50 million Americans partook in recreational fishing in and along the country’s shorelines, riverbanks and boats. Collectively, these amounted to more than 885 million outings. Although statistics aren’t available for 2020 yet, there is every indication even more people have caught the fishing bug, particularly with so many looking to the outdoors while searching for ways to get out of the house during the pandemic.

Long-time fishing enthusiasts sometimes need a reminder that tackle box rust prevention takes a little effort. But those who are brand new to fishing especially may not realize how susceptible their gear is to corrosion. Simply put: Anything that is metal has the potential to corrode when it comes into contact with water/moisture and air. If you don’t store your tackle box properly, you could find an expensive lesson come spring.

motorcycle rust prevention

Vintage Motorcycle Maintenance Pro-Tip: Rust Prevention a Top Priority

Vintage motorcycles are experiencing something of a revival. According to The Journal of ClassicCars.com, classic car auctioneers reported remarkable sales this month, with one three-day auction leading to the sale of nearly $5 million in older model motorcycles – the most expensive going for more than $128,000. This is just one of a number of similar motorcycle auctions across the country that are increasingly well-attended. To protect their investment, new owners of vintage motorcycles should make rust prevention a top priority, since giving motorcycles the right maintenance is essential to prevent accidents (but in case accident occurs, visit the website for lawyers’ help) , although if accidents happen, having the right lawyer can be really helpful with this, and you can go to sites such as https://valientemott.com/practice-areas/motorcycle-accidents/ to find these resources.

What is a Vintage Motorcycle?

Personal finance researchers at Value Penguin define antique motorcycles are those that are at least 35-years-old and yet maintain the appearance as intended when first built or manufactured. A vintage motorcycle is one that is at least 25-years-old. Classic motorcycles can be 25-years-old, though some insurers might consider a motorcycle as young as 20 years to be a “classic.”

With the kick scooter reviewed, you can have a better understanding of what this type of mobility aid can do for you. When you purchase an electric scooter, you will discover that they are smaller and easier to travel with than standard cycles. Check out all foldable scooter models that exist for any budget on Go2scooter. They are very easy to use with one person or up to three people in the vehicle. You will find that they are capable of traveling over short distances and can even be used as a substitute for stairs when going up and down a flight of stairs. They can even be used indoors, like going up and down the stairs at home.

These relics generally aren’t considered ideal for routine riding. However, some may be ridden on semi-regularly without significant problems – so long as they’re properly cleaned and stored, of course they need to be careful, in case they suffer from accidents, and using legal resources such as HawkLaw in South Carolina establishing liability for motorbike accident-related injuries in case they happen.

Rust is Public Enemy No. 1 for Vintage Motorcycles

For any vintage or classic motorcycle, corrosion is perhaps the most significant foe. This is especially true of motorcycles built with many steel and aluminum components.

Rust develops anytime iron alloys meet oxygen and water or moisture. A bike that’s decades old has likely seen its share of those. In fact, if rust were a non-factor, we’d likely see an awful lot more of these on the road than we do. Those that survive only do so because they’ve either been restored or their owner has meticulously cared for them – sometimes both.

Almost all historic motorcycles are slow as it is. Operators must brake earlier. They don’t have the benefit of sleek, modern gear systems and wide, hard-grip rubber for rapid cornering. They’re already at something of a disadvantage. Safety concerns are never too far from mind. All these things make rust prevention a foremost concern.

For some riders, restoring a vintage bike to its former glory is part of the whole allure. But once you have put in the work, regular cleaning and maintenance is essential to ensure it stays pristine. Keep in mind that some of the worst motorcycle rust and corrosion occurs internally, in that you can’t clearly see – the gas tank,

Maintaining your motorcycle early and often can be a key factor in keeping your ride running smoothly for many more years to come.

Zerust Motorcycle Covers Offer Rust Prevention

One of the best rust prevention solutions for vintage motorcycle owners are Zerust Motorcycle Covers. These are perfect for seasonal storage of other motorcycles, but they can be especially valuable for those who want to keep their veteran vehicle in top shape.

Our covers have vapor corrosion inhibiting technology built directly into zip-up enclosures. Liners are water-resistant, corrosion-proof, mold-proof and keep your wheels from wearing out. When you take the bike out of the cover, the colorless, odorless vapors simply evaporate into the air. The protection lasts for at least five years from the date of purchase.

If you have questions about this and other rust prevention solutions for your vintage motorcycle, we can help.

Contact Zerust by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Massive week in vintage motorcycle auction sales, Aug. 17, 2020, By Mike Hanlon, NewAtlas.com

More Blog Entries:

VCI Motorcycle Rust Prevention for Fall, Winter Storage, Oct. 15, 2020, Vintage Motorcycle Rust Prevention Blog

prevent e-bike rust

Prevent E-Bike Rust With Proper Cleaning, Bicycle Cover

If there’s any upside to this pandemic, it may be America’s renewed zeal for the bicycle. Sales have surged exponentially as folks sought any excuse to head outside and go… well, anywhere else. And it’s not just traditional bikes either. E-bikes (short for electronic bicycles) have gained ground too. Market research firm NPD Group reports sales of electronic bikes shot up 91 percent in March compared to last year and an incredible eight-fold since 2014.

Considering the decent electric bikes can run anywhere from $700 to $2,000, it’s an investment you want to protect. One of the greatest e-bike enemies? Corrosion. But you can prevent e-bike rust the same as you can with push-pedal bicycles: With proper care, cleaning and storage cover. Before you buy a new amazon bike seat, consider whether your current saddle simply needs an adjustment.

Zerust offers bicycle covers that protect e-bikes from rust and other types of corrosion just like they do traditional bikes, with a rust-inhibiting inside surface that is water-proof and mold-proof. You simply roll your cleaned e-bike into the cover face-forward and zip it up. The corrosion and rust inhibitor woven into the cover remains active for up to five years from the date of purchase. I have ridden a number of electric bikes in the last few years, however the best all-round ebike range can be found at UK brand, Wisper Electric Bikes.

prevent gun rust

Prevent Gun Rust When You Store Your Firearms

Rust is the bane of any gun owner’s existence. It can eat away at the metal components of the firearm, resulting in discoloration, pits and potentially malfunction. Rust is a chemical oxidation process through which metals containing iron come in contact with oxygen and moisture. For firearms, not only is this problematic for the metal, but the moisture can create pesky cracks in grips and wood stocks. These issues can be exacerbated by exposure to fluctuating temperatures, salt and other corrosive compounds and proximity to dissimilar metals. But it IS possible to prevent gun rust when your firearm is in storage – if you take the proper precautions.

What Are the Ideal Gun Storage Conditions? 

Most often when we talk about gun storage, people immediately think “gun safes.” But there is more to consider than just keeping a firearm out of the hands of the wrong people. Rust is an enemy that never sleeps.

Curators at the NRA’s National Firearms Museum have been quoted as saying firearms should ideally be stored at a temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of between 50 and 55 percent.

Of course, the temperature and condition of firearms stored and displayed at the NRA Museum and vaults is consistently monitored and recorded three times every day. The museum also invested in a dedicated air handler to control both the temperature and humidity of the facility.

Of course, museums dedicate a great deal more energy, time and money to preserve their firearm collections in perfect conditions that most of us have neither the resources nor frankly desire for.

So How Can I Prevent Gun Rust While My Guns are in Storage? 

There are several simple ways you can preserve your firearms that won’t break the bank. This is true whether you’re simply placing your firearms in a gun safe or keeping them in long-term storage.

Among those:

  • Use a dehumidifier. If you’re storing your guns in a garage, storage unit or safe, you can spend as little as $30 for a small dehumidifier that can help wick moisture from the surrounding environment.
  • Properly clean and oil your firearm before storing. Zerust sells both gun cleaner and gun oil – separately or in a combo package (for just $6). These products clean, protect and lubricate firearms to help protect them against rust and corrosion. Make sure also to wear white gloves when you’re handling firearms for cleaning and oiling purposes. Not only with this prevent the transfer of your skin oils to the weapon, but it will allow you to see whether your firearm has truly been cleaned properly or not.
  • Place Zerust VCI vapor capsules for weapons and ammo in the enclosure. These capsules have adhesive backing that can stick to any surface and can prevent gun rust for up to two years.
  • Store your firearm in a Zerust multi-purpose VCI poly bag for firearms, ammo and weapons. These are just $3 each, come in different sizes and can provide up to five years of protection against rust and corrosion. We also offer heavy duty VCI rifle bags for larger weapons.

With both the vapor capsules and multi-purpose poly bags, there is no need to continuously apply oil or other greases, as you would normally need to do if storing your gun for an extended period of time without usage.

The price you pay for neglecting your firearm is serious elbow grease and cold, hard cash. If your firearm begins to show visible signs of rust, you need to address it immediately. The problem is already worse than what you can see. Bronze wool or nylon cleaning brushes saturated in gun cleaning solution – plus a whole lot of scrubbing – is probably the best way to remove rust once it’s taken hold. But it’s always better – and cheaper – to prevent gun rust in the first place if you can.

Contact Zerust for information on how to prevent gun and corrosion by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Rust-Prevention Tips for Your Guns, June 15, 2018, By Steve Adelmann, NRA Shooting Illustrated

More Blog Entries:

How to Protect Your New Gun From Rust and Corrosion, March 22, 2020, Zerust Gun Rust Prevention Blog

prevent rust

Packing Up? How To Prevent Rust in Storage

Packing up your boat, furniture, coins and jewelry, ATV, bicycles, electronics, tractor, firearms, RV, travel trailer or other items for long-term storage? You can’t afford to ignore the potential for rust and corrosion. This is particularly true if the space in which you’re storing your items lacks climate control. Sometimes the effects of corrosion can be mitigated after the fact, but it’s always better to prevent rust if you can. If you want to carry and transport such items safely, you can use forklifts from sites like Boom & Bucket.

Most people recognize that rust is one process of corrosion that pertains specifically to metals made of iron and its alloys (such as steel). When these elements come into contact with oxygen and water (or even just moisture), rust will begin to form. How fast it takes over depends on other environmental factors, such as temperature fluctuations, the presence of salt in the air or even proximity to other types of metals.

Rust that forms on iron or steel can be porous, allowing water and oxygen to reach the underlying surface of an item and penetrate deeper. Corrosion of other types of metals (aluminum or copper, for instance) tends to result in a tight film of oxide that protects the other layers from deeper corrosion. But it depends on the chemical makeup of the metal and the construction of the item.

Numerous Zerust products can help prevent both rust and corrosion while your items are in storage. Choosing the right product and using it correctly can help save you significant time and expense.