gun rust prevention winter

Chilling Out: Cold Weather Gun Rust Prevention

With the northern hemisphere now firmly in winter’s icy grip, extra precaution is critical to keeping your weapons safe from the clutches of cold weather. Gun rust prevention in winter doesn’t need to be costly or time-consuming, but it must consider several factors:

  • Composition of metal components;
  • Temperature of storage areas;
  • Humidity levels.

Proactive gun rust prevention in winter is critical to prevent degradation and breakage of the firearm. The same problems can impact ammunition. This kind of wear isn’t just unsightly. It can be deadly.

To safely and effectively shield your firearms from the unforgiving elements of winter, Zerust has an array of products to fit your use and storage plan.

Risk of Gun Rust Heightened in Summer Humidity

Gun rust has been around as long as firearms have been made of metal (which is to say, always). Sports enthusiasts, hunters, law enforcement officers and those with concealed carry licenses – they may all take great caution to ensure the gun is properly cleaned, oiled and stored in a cool, dry place. However, a gun storage plan that involves anything less than vapor corrosion inhibitors won’t guarantee your weapon stays rust-free – especially in the summer. Gun barrels and metal receivers are particularly vulnerable. gun rust prevention

Why Summer Raises the Risk of Gun Rust

Technically, your firearm and/ or its components can be at risk of rust any time of year. Guns are metal objects and any metal that comes in contact with oxygen and moisture can be exposed to potential corrosion. Carry guns have especially high rates of rust, given that they are often in frequent contact with the oils of human skin.

Sweat in particular can cause more gun rust because in addition to the moisture, our sweat is high in salinity. Salt is also corrosive. The hotter it is, the more we sweat, and if we do so while handling a piece, there is a greater likelihood it’s going to be exposed to damaging moisture and salt. Plus more people are using and handling their guns at outdoor ranges when the weather is nicer. Even if you have a favorite indoor range you use in the dead of winter, you probably aren’t sweating bullets there.

But another reason summer may be especially risky for your gun is that general humidity levels in the air are higher than usual.