Tips for Shopping the Best ATV Cover

Shopping for the Best ATV Cover

All terrain vehicles, also known as ATVs, light utility vehicles, quad bikes or just quads, sell for anywhere between $3,000 to $25,000. If you’re thinking of buying an ATV, you should also be considering how to cover it up when you’re not riding so you can protect your investment. The best ATV cover is one that is properly-sized, durable, water resistant, and provides specific protection against rust and corrosion.

ATVs have gained enormous popularity in recent years. With their low-pressure tires, high torque, and ability to adroitly navigate rugged terrains, they’re a great deal of fun, but they’re also increasingly used for a broad range of utility applications. With already more than 1.2 million ATV owners in the U.S.,  ATV sales are expected to climb by 7 percent between now and 2027, according to Global Market Insights.Best ATV cover

While an ATV is nothing if not tough, it still requires TLC, just like any other vehicle. In fact, because it’s so frequently put through the paces in the harsh elements, it may require even more meticulous care than the average engine. Failure to properly clean your ATV (including the undercarriage) and store it can cause it to rapidly deteriorate. It will need more maintenance and a faster replacement. Whether you are going to keep your quad indoors or store it outside, it’s imperative to find the best ATV cover.

Some must-haves:best ATV cover

  • Durable material. Your cover needs to protect your four-wheeler from the corrosive impact of elements like snow, salt, sand, rain, sun, wind, and dirt/debris. Prolonged exposure to any of these elements can ruin seats, cables, grips, tires, and electrical components. If your ATV is left out in the rain, it won’t be long before excessive condensation causes corrosion to creep up – sometimes in places you won’t notice it immediately, such as in the gas tank. Having an ATV cover that is durable is going to ensure the damaging elements stay out. Another reason it’s smart to have a durable cover is so that you aren’t constantly replacing it. You can probably find a dirt-cheap cover, but if you have to replace it every year or every few months, you aren’t saving all that much. In fact, you could be losing money because of the risk of greater damage to your ride.
  • Adequate sizing. The best ATV cover is going to be one that fully covers your ride – even the undercarriage – but isn’t oversized, allowing moisture to seep inside. This not only helps ensure the elements stay out, but that prying eyes can’t take a peak inside. Vandals and thieves are almost always going to go for the low-hanging fruit. An ATV that is fully concealed is not only harder to remove, it isn’t easy to see the make/model or the shape it’s in – details that may otherwise help a would-be thief determine what’s necessary to haul it off quickly.
  • Breathable material. You want the material to be water resistant, but the best ATV cover is also going to be breathable to prevent moisture from building up inside. If you use just a standard, plastic cover, you’re going to be unpleasantly surprised by mildew, rust, and other forms of corrosion.
  • UV protection. If your ATV is going to be primarily stored outdoors, your ATV cover should be one that shields against the sun’s potentially damaging rays. Both the heat and the light can contribute to weakening or breaking down of fabrics, rubber, and even metal components of any vehicle.
  • Rust prevention. Very few ATV covers specifically protect against rust and corrosion, but it really is essential. Most metals have the potential to corrode when exposed to air and water/moisture. ATVs are made to be used in the mud and muck, so there’s little keeping them entirely clean and dry at all times. But it’s not enough to simply give it a thorough clean and dry afterward (though doing so is important). The trick is to use an ATV cover with vapor corrosion inhibiting (VCI) technology to shield against rust at the molecular level, so long as the vehicle is enclosed inside. As soon as the cover is opened, the VCI particles simply dissipate harmlessly into the air.

If you already have an ATV or have just received one as a gift or are planning to purchase one in the near future, give some thought too to your storage solutions, including the best ATV cover.

Contact Zerust for information on an ATV rust cover and ATV rust prevention by emailing us or calling (330) 405-1965.

Additional Resources:

Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation in the United States and its Regions and States: An Update National Report from the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE), Feb. 2008, U.S. Department of Agriculture

More Blog Entries:

ATV Rust Prevention Better Than Tackling After the Fact, June 14, 2020,  Best ATV Cover Blog

gun rust-free

Keeping Your New Gun Rust-Free

The upward trend of gun purchases is greater than ever this holiday season (which coincides with hunting season). Although lacking in any official national sales tally, we do know background checks by the FBI’s NICS reached 21 million nationally last year. The National Shooting Sports Foundation reports 2021 is shaping up to be the second-highest gun sales year in history, just behind 2020. If you receive a new gun as a gift, it’s important to take care of it properly to ensure it lasts for years to come – and functions correctly each time. Keeping your gun rust-free is an essential part of firearm care – and safety.

“A rusted gun is a dangerous gun,” explained Zerust Consumer Products CEO Budd Dworkin. “Unfortunately, people too often underestimate how quickly rust can creep into the crevices and cause major problems, ones that may not even be blatantly visible. As rust prevention experts, we take this very seriously, which is why we offer numerous solutions that will work for just about every type of firearm – and firearm owner.”

Rust is the union of oxygen + moisture + metal (specifically, iron and its alloys). Other types of metal can be similarly corroded, but it’s only iron metals, which include steel, stainless steel, cast iron, wrought iron, ferrochrome, elinvar, and kovar, that are technically considered “rust.”  With firearms, it can eat away at the metal components, resulting in a range of problems going beyond mere discoloration.

The moving parts of a gun can be adversely impacted, particularly at the points of contact, where you may see more wear and reduced slide. If a magazine spring rusts, it could result in failure to feed. If the slide of a gun is rusted, there could be issues with failure to cycle, extract, or eject. In the barrel, rust can even cause potential explosion due to pressure.