tool rust prevention

Will My Tools Rust if I Store Them in My Garage?

Rust is the bane of any tool owner’s existence, damaging the look and feel of the metal and ultimately inhibiting the tool’s effectiveness. Tool rust is a chemical process that can occur anytime the metal components interact with air and moisture. Garage storage is ideal for many tool owners because that’s where people often keep a work bench or space. But while garages, sheds or basements may provide basic shelter from the elements, they are not going to prevent rust entirely.

Hand tools may be especially susceptible to rust. This is partly because they contain so many metal components, but also because those components come directly into contact with skin oils and sweat. It is essential to be proactive about stopping rust before it can cause any damage to tools.

Ideal tool storage involves clean, dry tools, low humidity, cool, even temperatures, proper air circulation and the use of vapor corrosion inhibitors, such as drawer liners, plastabs, poly bags and vapor capsules.

classic car cover classic car rust

When a Patch of Classic Car Rust Nearly Ruins Retirement Plans

A classic car tells the tale of not just where we’re going, but where we’ve been. But the threat of classic car rust can put the brakes on that story. In the case of one disabled veteran who loves to take scenic rides in the right lane with his service animal, rust is threatening to potentially upend his remaining retirement.

According to the Las Cruces Sun News, the former combat vet/stuntman purchased a brand new Chevrolet El Camino in 1983 in a small Kentucky town. He named her Consuela, and she’s been his main mode of motor transport ever since. However, he’s hit a bump in the road since moving from Florida to New Mexico to try to register it – and rust is reportedly to blame.

The newspaper reports the motor vehicle division in his new home city can’t verify the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) on the car. The primary numbers are faded, but the secondary display, located on the frame of the car, is obscured by rust. There’s no sticker to verify the VIN on the dash, and the car was made before auto manufacturers were required to maintain onboard diagnostic VIN readers. He found the original purchase documents, but the city says that still doesn’t help him solve the VIN issue.

Although most classic car owners don’t typically share this same sort of headache, almost all are familiar with the risk of classic car rust.